creative media & digital culture
@ washington state university, vancouver

The Nouspace Student Research Gallery

Student Art Work
Exhibit 28
12.18
Story Worlds

Issue 28 features a range of student digital projects that build story worlds....


The Nouspace Student Research Gallery is a showcase for exemplary work of CMDC students. Each issue highlights projects that demonstrate digital innovation at the levels of development (code and software expertise), design and social engagement. DTC students work individually and collaboratively to try to solve problems, engage and inform communities and/or create cultural artifacts that speak to the changing intersections between art, technology, and the humanities. This gallery chronicles the growth and direction of the CMDC Program as well as the development of the field of digital media. Remembering where we came from helps us to know what the potentials may be as we invent the future.

- The Faculty of The CMDC

Exhibit 28 / Story Worlds / 12.18

Story Worlds

"Worldbuilding" is the process of constructing an imaginary world, or whole fictional universe. While the word is used specifically in reference to making games and fantasy fiction, its meaning can be applied to any form of storytelling. Plot and character are important, but so are the details that construct the story world for the imagination.

Issue 28 features a range of student digital projects that build story worlds. Whether it is a short video fiction, a mini-documentary an interactive fiction, a game or 3D animation, CMDC students learn to build worlds out of landscapes, objects, facial expressions, gestures and actions. These details must work for the imagination in creating a believable whole out of fragments. In DTC 491, Digital Cinema, students learn about the importance of "visual evidence": the depiction of visual (and auditory) details that will convey setting, character, plot and meaning. In documentary work, "B-roll" is what drives narration with details that are supported by the interviews or voice over. In interactive fiction and games, writing, design and interactivity work to build cohesive story world. In the animation projects featured here, personalities, humor and conflict are conveyed from the gestures and movements of chess pieces.

Will Luers
Lecturer

Brendan Reardon

The Unsung Hero

DTC 491 - Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

When I began this project, I did not start with what visual effects I wanted to incorporate, or what action scene I could create. I wanted to tell a good story. Any piece of cinema needs good story. That was my goal. Moreover, I began with the script and started busting ideas out. This process was very important because without a good script, you will find yourself improvising later on, which can hurt the overall quality of the finished product. It took four drafts before the script was in a good place for the production to move foreward. Then, I began coordinating with my cast on what props we needed, what shooting locations we would be filming at, and I created a shot list so that I did not have to remember/imagine how I wanted the film to be shot. Then, using about four days for filming we finished shooting the film. Then post-production went into effect. The first thing in post-production that I did was edit the footage. I looked through all the shots, picked the best ones, cut them, reshot anything that I needed, and then tightened it up so I could work on the audio. Audio, by far, was the most challenging part of this project. For some scenes, I had to entirely replace the audio because the audio recorded on location did not work. Also, finding good SFX for gun shots, radios, and even footsteps was very time consuming. However, finding a good SFX is key to creating a scene that is believable. Once, I finished designing the SFX for the world the story took place in, I created the VFX for the muzzle flashes. Then I moved onto color grading, titles, and music to finish up the short film. It was a lengthy but rewarding process. The one thought that I kept in my head for the entire production of the short film, when doing any task, was: "How does this part effect the story?" It is very important to keep story in the forefront of everything for cinema because if you do not, the film could drag, be confusing, or just lack direction.

Sydnie Kobza

Holiday Friends in Astoria

DTC 491 - Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

I've always loved "behind-the-scenes" type videos - the ones that explain how something was made, or a look into a creative process before the final product is produced. With that in mind, I knew for this final project that I wanted to create something of that sort, so I chose a documentary style. Filming my friends in local band Holiday Friends was a natural fit for the project, as it allowed me to tell a story by shooting all aspects leading up to a single show of theirs. Essentially, I shot one night of interviews and rehearsal, and a separate night of the actual concert. I asked certain questions that I knew would provide good visual evidence, such as the ones about rehearsing and pre-show rituals, and listened to the interview in between shoot days so I was prepared to film anything else that had mentioned. Making everything cohesive required a lot of piecing together and was actually done more-so at the end, when I listened to the interview and realized that a certain few sentences would go perfectly over a certain bit of footage. For example, pairing footage of the crowd and their phone lights, and the band jumping, with audio of the drummer talking about the magic that sometimes happens on stage. In terms of storytelling, I wanted it to be fairly chronological to demonstrate that these are the things that go into a single show for the band. I also tried to vary my framing to keep it visually interesting.

Timothy Clark

Dylan's Story

DTC 491 - Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

In creating Dylan's story, I wanted to show the emotional journey of going through the gender transition process. To make this work, Dylan and I talked about her thoughts and feelings about the process before we sat down and had a straight forward interview. Going to multiple locations and filming helped make the conversation flow more naturally. Doing this allowed me to collect some visual evidence to strengthen then narrative. Timing was key when creating this documentary, as it gives the viewer a chance to let the information sink in, and offers the chance to reflect and put themselves in her situation. The film came together in editing, where I was able to edit down hours of material into a narrative that captured the more raw and emotional aspects of her world.

Troy Scott

Debbie McGravey

DTC 491 - Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

This is my career interview project for the WSUV CMDC Digital Cinematography course, and the profile video I was hired to create for the Ridgefield Boosters President and Ridgefield District Volunteer of the Year, Debbie McGravey.

Taylor Jones

Vintage Shag

DTC 491 - Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

For this short documentary, I worked with Haily Holt and Mike Wilson, a Collegiate Shag dance instructing couple. I knew I wanted to highlight their dancing skills and love of vintage fashion, so I planned a list of the b-roll shots I wanted. I also prepared interview questions that were focused on getting them to talk about those things. We filmed at the Light Box, a beautiful studio in Portland. I filmed with my Canon 6d and used both a 50mm 1.4 lens and a 24-70mm 2.8 lens with a Rode Video Micro shotgun mic. I shot in 60fps so I could use slow motion for cinematic effect during the b-roll of them dancing. While the studio had the most amazing lighting, it had a super loud heating unit that made me regret not using a lav mic during the interview. During the video editing process, I realized I was lacking visual evidence to match them talking about the community and friendship aspects of dance, so I downloaded and used videos from their Facebook pages that showed them at many dance events with their friends. I really wanted to focus the narrative on the sense of pride and community they had built. Following this passion of theirs led them to create lifelong friendships all over the world. Overall I was happy with the end result.

Holly Slocum

Truffle Dog

DTC 491 - Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

My mom always has a story. They're always beautiful, they're always heartfelt, and they always have a certain magic to them. They're also almost always about dogs. For my job/hobby profile, I wanted to try and capture some of her magic while also providing some basic information about what she does. Training truffle dogs is already a topic that usually gets a bit of interest- especially considering truffles' value in culinary communities- but it was important to me to highlight the deeper relationship that she has with her work and her truffle dog. I paid special attention to the framing of each shot to help accomplish those goals. Her interview is meant to feel casual and personal, so being down on the ground with her really helped ground the scene in a similar way. Medium and long shots left plenty of open space, helping to emphasize the forest and its important role in the story. It also left plenty of space for Rhu, the dog, to move around without having to maneuver the camera on my limited tripod. Framing also played an important role in helping the continuity of the video. I wanted to each shot to feel like it flowed into the next easily; letting the editing be as invisible as possible so her narration could take center stage. The choice to not use music was also aimed to help emphasize her narration and story. Hopefully, by only using the chirps and whispers of the forest behind her voice, the viewer can feel just a little closer bit closer to the moment.

Richard Boneski

Hidden River Roasters

DTC 208 Introduction to Digital Cinema, Prof. David Alonzo

"Story, story, story" is the word that enumerated consistently from Professor Alonzo. It can be so tempting to focus purely on getting the perfect lighting, or the steadiness of a shot when conformulating a film, but I chose to focus specifically on what the narrative of my "Hidden River Roasters: Mini Doc" would be. Making a story from basically no script is tricky, so the quality of the video relies a lot on what the interviewees say based off of questions. Using the acquired dialogue, I focused on presenting the world and people of Hidden River Roasters accurately, with a bit of exaggeration. I wanted to show each different tear of the company, so I made a point to interview a owner, a manager, and a barista. This way I could gather the rich perspectives of multiple people. When editing, wrapping these three different perspectives together was tricky, because they all gave unique answers. It quickly became apparent that these three interviewees are quite positive people, which is terrific in real life, but hampers building conflict for a narrative video. As a result, I had to use any minute conflict to establish a tension in making the story progress. By combining the perspectives of multiple members of the Hidden River Roasters family, I weaved the little bit of conflict they showed to represent the bean-based world they function in daily.

Student Art Work

John Alexander

Beyond the Horizon

DTC 354- Digital Storytelling, Prof. Dene Grigar

project launch



"Beyond the Horizon" is a fictional story created with HTML5, CSS, Jquery, and JavaScript. The story tells the tale of a mad monarch named Avarice. Avarice, believing the "others" beyond their borders are attempting to infiltrate their kingdom commands his people to destroy their land and lower his tower into a pit. The people of the land of Avarice forced at gunpoint are made to comply until they find themselves with the upper hand and finally put an end to his reign of terror. Beyond the Horizons art style was heavily influenced by author Stevan Zivadinovic's story Hobo Lobo of Hamelin. I very much enjoyed the rough and textured feel of Zivadonvic's imagery. I tried to encompass some of this same style in Beyond the Horizon as I believe it lends itself to the atmosphere created for this story. The narrative of Beyond the Horizon has a rhyme and cadence running through it that came about organically while trying to put pen to paper. Having never written any forms of poetry before, creating any semblance of rhythm became quite an endeavor. The audio, which can be played by selecting specific words throughout the text of the story, is used to engage the reader and aid in the creation of a sense of immersion.

Student Art Work

Nicole Guddal

The Dreamer

DTC 354- Digital Storytelling, Prof. Dene Grigar

project launch



For my DTC 354 class, we were asked to create a game with a narrative. I chose to use RPG Maker MV, a template from Steam, to create my game. I had never used such a thing before so I watched tutorials and made some test maps until I had a basic concept of what I wanted to do. Based on the templates allowed, I focused my narrative around "anthro" or people with animal-like features, such as cat ears or tails. My protagonist, is an anthro woman who has been enslaved to a human Lord who has somehow been erasing her memories, and also torturing her, to keep her compliant and under his control. Using the RPG maker, I was able to build each map in my image; the castle, the city, and nearly every character with a name and emotion, was my own creation. It was after the main story line that I realized there are pre-loaded maps to use and I did change or use some as a base further on in the story. After this project I have found that I thoroughly enjoy using RPG Maker MV and will be using it again in the future.

Cody Tucker, Val Krasovskiy, and Miranda Barnes

RollOut!

DTC 335 - 3D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell

Starting from a storyboard Cody came up with the idea of implementing robots and a “cheesy” transformation scene that starts at 27 seconds. Since we all like anime we wanted to stylize the transformation scene to be similar in taste along with some of the music. The models were divided amongst each group member; Cody modeled the chess pieces/robots/stereo/chess board, Val modeled the chairs, and Miranda modeled the table/tear drop. The hardest part during this project was learning how to correctly rig both robots and get them to bend in the correct direction along with making sure each piece moved appropriately. This was done by Cody and it made animating a lot easier later on. Rigging each robot provided a more “realistic” movement pattern that the robots carried out compared to the separate pieces. The lighting throughout the animation was done by Cody as well as most of the textures, Val and Miranda textured the table and chairs and Miranda edited the skydome by lowering the saturation and giving it a slight gaussian blur to prevent distraction. Along with rendering, the animation including the cameras was divided by each group member to complete; 1-6/20-27 seconds was done by Cody, 7-13 was done by Val, and 14-19 was done by Miranda. The rest was; 28-40/62-68 seconds was done by Cody (transformation scene), 41-61/69-84 was done by Miranda. The final music, SFX, and compilation of the whole project was done by Val in After Effects to get it ready to upload in Vimeo.

Brendan Reardon, Gary Langan, Paige Halle

Chess Playing Chess

DTC 335 - 3D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell

The DTC 335 class taught by Brenda Grell served to introduce how to model and animate 3D figures in the program Maya and render them into a video. Through the class, we were asked to work in groups and create a short animation using chess pieces to display the skills we learned in the class. For our animation, we wanted to create a chess playing chess theme. We thought it would be cool, and a little bit funny, if chess was playing chess through a computer. Then we brainstormed how we would go about creating our animation. We decided we would animate two separate files on Maya, one of the chess pieces playing on the keyboard and another of the actual screen game they play. After creating these elements, we would then use Adobe After Effects to join them.

Kara Hatton, Lucas Pauly, Peter Thompson

Cosmosian Love

DTC 335 - 3D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell

Cosmosian Love is a tale of love conquering war and hate. Where all it takes is one or two individuals who can see past each others differences and come together to tip the scales in their favor. Finding the beauty in one another to break down walls in a society that would dictate sides is where power truly lies. Life doesn't have to be a game in which you're a pawn. Blaze your own path.

Bradley Uravich, Joseph Stipan, Kathleen Zoller

Peace Among the Pieces

DTC 335 - 3D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell

Peace Among the Pieces" is an animated story about a pawn rebelling against its ruthless leader, advocating for peace after years of pointless violence and bloodshed between the two sides. The animation was created by students of the CMDC program in Washington State University, Vancouver. The goal of the assignment was to communicate a narrative through the use of chess pieces, and to demonstrate an understanding of the concepts learned over the course.

Megan Bina, Annie Hoch-South, Richard Lockett, Mason Stiller

Game of Chess

DTC 335 - 3D Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell

This video opens with a sweeping panning motion of the battle between the silver pieces and the gold pieces. The battlefield takes place in a pixelated clearing surrounded by pine and oak trees. A violent explosion greets the scene with a tree falling upon members of the gold team, who cry out in pain. Our story follows the hero, the golden mustachioed pawn. After the death of the golden king's queen at the hands of the silver bishop, the king is maddened with rage and grief at the death of his beloved. The hero is given a top secret mission to infiltrate the enemy lines to kill the enemy king. Our hero rides into battle on a majestic unicorn and engages in an epic battle with the silver bishop. Upon the defeat of the silver bishop, he takes his head and uses it as a disguise to take his place next to the enemy king. The hero is reminded of his mission and without hesitation, stabs the king in the torso. The silver king is strong and remains standing. With our hero's true identity exposed before the king, he makes a last ditch effort to make the king fall by launching his disguise at the silver king, rendering the king unconscious. The camera zooms out as the king takes his last breaths, and the golden pieces rejoice once the silver king's crown is raised confirming the victory. Realizing the battle is lost, the silver queen admits her defeat and raises the white flag of surrender.

Exhibit 27 / Immersive Experiences / 05.18

Immersive Experiences

Issue 27 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery features 10 projects that are in some sense immersive experiences. The new Special Topics course taught by Professor Dene Grigar, DTC 338 VR/AR Environments, brought CMDC students a class dedicated to the theory and practice of virtuality and augmented reality. The great variety in these class projects, from conception to execution, is testament to the possibilities of immersive and embodied technology in the fields of education, therapy and good 'ole kinesthetic fun.

Along with the new VR class, two new video classes DTC 208 Introduction to Digital Cinema and DTC 491 Digital Cinema furthur develop the CMDC program in the area of digital video. Both are theory and practice classes, providing students with foundations in cinema language and history, along with the latest practices of online video journalism, fictional shorts, remix video, interactive and database cinema. The video works in this issue all use techniques of cinematic immersion, yet each depicts a unique story world or emotional environment.

Will Luers
Lecturer

Jessica Rushing, Austin Fields, Moneca Roath, Thomas Dill, Christian Denny

Radioactive Rockmonster

Virtual Reality
DTC338- VR/AR Environments, Prof. Dene Grigar

My team's objective for creating the Radioactive Rock Monster project was to combine the player and audience experience as much as possible. Specifically, have you ever wondered what it would feel like to be in a movie, not acting in a movie, but experiencing the events portrayed? What would it feel like to physically stand next to the super spy, or super hero while they save the world? VR allows players to get that experience and we wanted to reach a level of immersion that extends beyond the player to the viewer. We focused on building up the viewer experience with a trailer video in order to create tension for the viewer that would transfer to watching the player in the game. We added in game tension building elements such as a timer that counts down, music and sounds designed specifically to produce feelings of unease and a clip of the trailer to connect the game and the video. We also placed a rock climbing helmet in the game on the player and two pick axes for picking up ammunition rock that were visible to the viewer in the green-screen environment. Our goal was to firmly place the player in the scene for the viewer to make a connection between their self and the prescience the player experiences. We worked hard on making the VR terrain as real as possible so that the fantastic elements, the monster, glowing axes with super strength and cartoon helmet on the players head, would juxtapose with the terrain in an interesting way that actually helps the player and viewer suspend disbelief a little as if experiencing a motion picture in real time.

Baily Anderson, Katie Bowen, Troy Scott, William Erickson, Nathanael Rawson, Erin McBride

oVRflow

Virtual Reality
DTC338- VR/AR Environments, Prof. Dene Grigar

Integrating virtual artifacts and interactions with graspable, real-life objects, our Mixed Reality experiments help educate K-12 STEM students in practical but captivating ways. This demonstration re-imagines the classic baking soda and vinegar volcano as a tangible digital experience. Using Vive controllers, students hold digital flasks containing the "baking soda" and "vinegar," which they can pour into a scaled-down, but lifelike, 3D volcano. Once both "substances" mix in the crater, an animated eruption catapults sparks, smoke, and lava. Not only does oVRflow teach the same chemistry as the traditional experiment, it does it in more exciting, cleaner, economic, and sustainable ways. The experiment can be repeated over and over and conducted virtually anywhere.

Kaitlyn Slorey, McKenzie Wells, Peter Thompson, Cody Gilbert

Don't Look Down

Virtual Reality
DTC338- VR/AR Environments, Prof. Dene Grigar

In this environment, the user is standing on a platform and has to solve a series of puzzles in order to advance to the next platform. The user's main goal is to “balance” on these platforms while simultaneously finding and pressing buttons to unlock the next platform. There are attacking objects that are directed at the user that must be deflected with a shield. More objects will appear with each platform which will make it more difficult for the user to advance. When the attacking object collides with the shield the object disappears. The user's body occupies an actual space on the platform and if they look over the edge or down for too long then they will fall and the scene will reload. This experience is designed to test the user's multitasking ability under stressful conditions. The project is being developed with Unity and tested on an HTC Vive while utilizing the stereo camera to show the user's interaction in real space.

Student Art Work

John Alexander, Andrew Pham, David Schneider, Royner Mendoza, Keaton Burnett

Kinematic

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


Our primary vision for this mixed reality project was to create a physical therapy training aid for those entering the field of physical therapy. In our project, physical therapy students will engage with a virtual dummy. The virtual dummy, acting as a stand in for a physical therapy patient, will allow students and trainees to practice techniques that would otherwise be practiced on expensive medical manikins. Upon starting the program, trainees will be presented with the option of choosing which physical therapy techniques they'd like to practice. These could include a variety of different exercises such as shoulder rotations, scaptions (the elevation of the scapular plane), shoulder extensions, and possibly more. From here, users will be placed into a physical therapy room where they will see a manikin in which they can manipulate and another manikin which will be demoing the movement and techniques for each specific scenario. Our current model allows for an internal shoulder rotation exercise used for strengthening and shoulder injury prevention.

When the trainee approaches the manikin they will be prompted through the use of visual cues where to place their hands on the dummy. As the trainee manipulates the manikin and follows the training exercise they will be informed of techniques to remember (such as reminding the trainee to keep the patients elbow close to their body). Upon successfully completing the training exercise the user will be notified with an auditory cue and returned to the starting screen.

The use of a virtual manikin and a virtual environment come with many affordances not found in traditional training methods. The virtual mannequins will help alleviate the exorbitant costs of a providing medical manikins (ranging from $1500-$3000 per manikin) for students. Further, costs found in hiring trainers and providing training locations can be cut through the affordances of distance based and virtual learning.

Valerie Parrish

Dear Enemy

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

Dear Enemy, by Valerie Parrish

You trespass with darkness
A paralyzing blanket of deception
Causing an escalation of fear
Torturing the vulnerable soul

I see you
Draining your victim's light
Slithering into the streams of my being

The anguish
The despair
The pain

Though I must warn you
My strength
You've underestimated
Your malice has seen its final days

Welcome to your downfall

Evan Cottle

The Low Season: Writing

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

This is a short documentary about how this band writes their music and how their ideas work together to become the songs that they preform.

Mackenzie Koch

Forgotten

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

Forgotten is a hybrid/fictional video that focuses on a girl that suddenly wakes up in the forest. Unable recall past events that could have to lead her to where she is, she tries to uncover the truth to the forest and discover why she was brought there. However, some things are better left undiscovered…

Scott Allen

Creative Blocks are AWFUL

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

Creative burnouts happen at the most inopportune times. It just so happens that I was experiencing one this semester, and it really took a toll on my final project for this class. I originally wanted to create a video about how difficult it is to deal with sensory input when I am reading. However, as I was planning out the project I realized that my vision could not be expressed in a simple video and required a lot more special effects than I was capable of. Weeks went by while I tried to beat an idea out of my head. I had gone to a few locations and shot some random footage, hoping for any kind of spark of inspiration, but I ended up with nothing. For a brief moment, I played with the idea of doing a short biopic of myself, or something that captured my frustration of the semester, but both of these ideas felt flat and unappealing. A week before the rough cut was due, it was suggested by Will Luers that I write about the creative block I was experiencing, as well as to put my footage together and try to write a story to the images. The result was my final project titled “Creative Blocks are AWFUL”.

Student Art Work

Travis Jones

Wayward Woman

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



For my final project in DTC 491 (Digital Cinema) I went for trying to make a hypervideo website made entirely from using short ten to thirty second loops. The most difficult part of the assignment was that I had to show narrative or some kind of storyline. Even more difficult was trying to find ways to make the story loops branch off into a multilinear storyline. I was successful at making ten loops with narrative, all linked to the hyper template, and proper CSS. The part that I was unsuccessful about was having the storyline be multilinear. I wanted this to be a game in which the player has to start over if they don't pick the right button from two button options. I could only get my girlfriend and myself to act in the loops so I made most of the story about her character. I wanted the website to be about a mysterious woman who seems like a normal and everyday woman running errands, but she really has a hidden agenda. This is a cinema game in which you click the screen to move forward in the story.

Student Art Work

Valerie Eldridge

Persons of Interest

Video
DTC491- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Persons of Interest is a database narrative that tells the story of four young adults whose friend has been murdered and they were the last ones to see her. The story is told through police interrogation videos and occasionally shows flashbacks of what the friends are describing. The clips can be viewed in any order but are on the website in an order that clearly tells the viewers what happened and by the end it will be fairly obvious who the killer is.

Exhibit 26 / New Forms / 01.18

New Forms

The CMDC program gives students the skills to design, code and build digital objects for practical uses in the world. The program also encourages students to break with standard methods and techniques in order invent new forms, either by working with emerging technologies or rethinking more common forms of communication.

The projects featured in the Issue 26 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery are all thoughtful in their design and implementation, but stand out in their creative invention of objects that have not existed before. The Senior Seminar project for Providence Academy was a large endeavor involving an app with augmented reality and a media-rich website. Bill Erickson went in his own direction with a work of electronic literature that uses JavaScript to change a text in unexpected ways. Evan Torres went beyond the standard JavaScript battle game by getting the user to stategize against an opponent. John Alexander created a geolocative game that can be played wherever you are. Katelyn Lindsey mixed a riddle game with the horror genre. And Holly Slocum used effective parallax animation to persuade about the global impact of the clothing industry.

Will Luers
Lecturer

Providence Academy Journey

Unity, HTML, CSS and JavaScript, Video
DTC497- Senior Seminar, Dr. Dene Grigar
project launch

Students of the Creative Media and Digital Culture program at Washington State University Vancouver have created a visitors' engagement tool utilizing contemporary augmented reality technology via smartphone and tablet for Providence Academy in downtown Vancouver, WA. Students also developed an interactive website with a digital timeline that further showcases the accolades of Mother Joseph and accompanies the content of the application.

Web Dev Team Jessica Smith, Team Leader
Nick Chow
Jenel Cohen
Austin Lewis
Jen Prosser
Mark Campbell
Multimedia Design Savage Savage, Team Leader
Chuck Mitchell
Polina Skylova
Content Development Team Eli Campbell & MacKenzie Koch, Co-Team Leaders
Mitchell Barnette, video
Bernd Hoffman, audio
Samantha Van Luik, 3D modeling
MacKenzie Koch, video
Ryan Schafte, 3D modeling
Amanda Egan, animation
Digital Marketing Team Adam Goddard, Team Leader
Brittany Davis
Cody Lane

Student Art Work

Bill Erickson

With Porter for a Cup

HTML5, JavaScript, jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



My desire with this piece is to make a work almost completely void of user interaction. I know that this runs counter to many popular uses of Javascript and jQuery development, especially as they pertain to creative works. Nevertheless, I want to create a work to be experienced and (almost) nothing else. I want to make a poem that evokes a certain angst as readers cede control to the narrative and to the code. Using Javascript timing events, I create an endlessly scrolling text that changes one line at a time on a 45.5 second interval; to stagger all the line changes, the first interval function is fired with a setTimeout of 0 second, the next interval is fired with a setTimeout of 1.5 seconds, and the subsequent functions all run thusly, 1.5 seconds apart. The hover function for pausing is blocked with a div that has been unbound from .mouseover, and it is set display none every time the last line change equals the first, or when the poem is in full view with all changes made. There is a history function written for each change, attached to a hoverIntent plugin, which I altered to delay for roughly 30 second. When fired, the history function cycles rapidly through all changes made until stopping at the first; upon moving away, it resumes where it left off. Each interval records its own state, so that, when paused, it will resume where it left off with the remaining time between intervals and with the correct text change. Because the scroll function operates on a pixel height, there are minor inconsistencies in the time taken to revolve the text as it changes, thus discrepancies arise in the percieved timing of word changes as well. Likewise, sometimes, when paused, the resume function misfires and throws the timing. All of these inconsistencies, I think, play into the overarching themes of the poem itself. Finally, all the audio and visual effects are made with conditionals based on the state of line changes, which are recorded as global variables so that I could call up their state at any point in the poem. I was thus able to effect changes at particular points when the mood changes. None of the style changes are subject to timing events, so they are unaffected by pauses. All code and music attributes below.

Student Art Work

Evan Torres

Evan's Battler

HTML5, JavaScript, jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Inspired by classic RPG games, where your imagination drove how monsters and heroes looked, Evan's Battler pits you, the hero, against an enemy with semi-randomly generated stats. The goal of the project was to create a simple battle engine with a few options for customization, including weapons, stats and trinkets. This goal was met beautifully and the game now has 27 options for trinkets, 5 weapons, a somewhat balanced enemy generator, an enemy description, and three classes to choose from.

The greatest challenge I faced was cleaning up the project from it's rough form during midterms, as well as modifying it to use arrays for the different weapons and trinkets available to the player: There were initially three different sections where I had to put the information for all of the items in the game as I added them, but now I simply have to fill out a single array. In theory, I could add as many or as few items as I want at this point.

Student Art Work

John Alexander

Bomb Run

HTML5, JavaScript, jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Bomb Run is a Geolocation based game for both those who jog/run or those who just want to play outdoors. This is the first game I've ever coded using HTML, CSS, and Javascript. The process of creating this game has been a very fun and challenging experience. I first began this project working with the Google Maps API unsure of what possiblities were attainable with a very basic knowledge of Javascript. Through many hours of research and help from many sources I was able to get this game running. The two main and invaluable sources in the creation of this project have been w3Schools.com and StackOverFlow.com. They both contain an amazing body of knowledge for anyone learning Javascript. Below is a list of many of the specific sources I accessed in creation of this project.

Student Art Work

Katelyn Lindsey

Annie's Dollhouse

HTML5, JavaScript, jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



For my project, I wanted to create a simple horror game using Javascript. This is something that I had never attempted before and so I thought the challenge would be fun. I ended up writing more Javascript than I ever have in my life and ended up with this vaguely creepy game. Most of the time I spent on this project was doing research for various things I wanted to accomplish in the game, such as the typing function. Overall, I am happy with the way that it turned out and I would like to continue the story of "Annie's Dollhouse" in the future.

Student Art Work

Holly Slocum

Unraveled: the Story of Our Clothes

HTML5, JavaScript, jQuery
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Hope is not lost. Technology and information has give workers in affected countries tools to begin to fight back. Protests, worker's rights groups, and businesses are working toward putting an end to the mistreatment of gamrent workers. Fashion is big though, and it's become a central part of many people's lives. Change won't happen over, and they can't do it alone. As long as we keep buying the clothes they die upon, their fight is made harder. Buy used clothes. Research companies that support fair trade practices and work to fix where the supply chain has failed and buy from them. Make businesses that source ethically and care about humanity your priority, and leave the heartless giants of the past behind.

Exhibit 25 / Digital Cinema / 09.17

Digital Cinema

The hardware and software for making video is now ubiquitous, accesible and affordable. Many of us have a production and post-production studio on our smartphone.

DTC 491 / DIGITAL CINEMA is a new CMDC course that addresses these many technical, social and professional changes in video as a communcation medium and artistic practice. Students are exposed to a range of digital cinema styles and approaches – video journalism, video remix, “webisodes”, cinematic games, hyperlinked video, video installation and database cinema-–and ultimately choose the approach that fits best with their creative and professional goals.

The course also gives students practical experience in working with digital video cameras and audio recorders, developing storyboards, interviewing and lighting subjects, editing with Adobe Premiere, integrating video on a webpage and preparing and distributing video for the web. The course approaches video production less as a set of specialized technical skills using high-end equipment, and more as a set of composition practices using commonly used tools.

The three works featured in Issue 25 show the range of expressive styles and approaches in our students' growing interest in cinema arts.

Will Luers
Lecturer

Julli Krishcko

Falling

Adobe Premiere
DTC338- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch

"The inspiration for this work came after watching a few films directed by Terrence Mallick. I was intrigued with his ability to capture powerful and complex feelings, emotions and relationships while using limited dialogue. My vision was to portray the struggle that can exist within ourselves to deal with the competing forces of good and evil. I wanted to capture someone who was trying to understand the presence of an overbearing corruptness within herself, while externally she existed in a beautiful world. My biggest takeaway is to always shoot footage in good lighting, you can always adjust the feel and atmosphere while editing without compromising detail." - Julli Krishcko

Cody Gilbert

The Kitchen

Adobe Premiere. After Effects
DTC338- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers

"Anyone who's ever had roommates will agree that it can be difficult to get along sometimes and it's no different for Jedi's. The point I was trying to make in this video was that fighting gets you nowhere and in this case only makes the mess bigger. The video was my final project in the Digital Cinema class. I wanted to use this video to showcase my cinematography, Adobe Premiere, and After Effects skills. My biggest challenge was working within such a confided space such as a kitchen. It really limited the shots that I was able to get. It made me think outside of the box and ultimately I decided to have the fight start in the living room and end up in the kitchen." - Cody Gilbert

Taylor Jones

Glass Ladder

Adobe Premiere
DTC338- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch

"This project started out as a job profile (intended to show what someone does for work) and turned into a short documentary about going back to school and changing careers. I filmed Bill Erickson either in his Glass Shop or at his home, depending on the subject of the interview questions. When we were discussing glass cutting, we were at the shop, and when we were discussing his switch to education and writing, I filmed him in his home that is littered with books. The locations acted as visual evidence for b-roll and allowed for shots of him performing the actions he was talking about. One challenge I ran into was the microphone not working. I had to rely on the on camera mic, which let in a lot of traffic noise when we were filming in the shop. I have titled the work “Glass Ladder” because Bill has reached the top of the Glass industry ladder, which couldn't support his intellectual passions." - Taylor Jones

Exhibit 24 / Portfolios / 05.17

The Portfolio

CMDC students graduate with a portfolio website that documents the digital projects they have completed in the program and highlights their skillset for prospective employers. In DTC 335, Multimedia Authoring, students learn to handcode and design what will be the first iteration of their portfolio website. They are encouraged to update and redisgn this site, throughtout their time of study, to better reflect their area of concentration and their "superpowers." Superpowers are discovered through the process of learning, making and mentoring. By the time of their Senior Seminar, DTC 497, students should have a clear idea of what they are good at, what they enjoy doing and what is marketable. It is in this final class that they rework their portfolio designs as professionals.

The 24th issue of The Nouspace Student Research Gallery features the portfolios websites of CMDC students in their first iteration, one of their handcoded projects in DTC 355. Included in the exhibit are a variety of approaches to the portfolio, but they all show exceptional ability in design and web coding.

Will Luers
Lecturer
Student Art Work

Amani Almazidi

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Julli Krishcko

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Diana Boligar

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Ryan Hanrahan

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Erin Mcbride

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

KC Johnson

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Student Art Work

Nathan Craciun

HTML5, jQuery, Responsive Design, Photoshop
DTC355 Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



Exhibit 23 / Games / 01.17

Games

The 23rd issue of The Nouspace Student Research Gallery is focused on CMDC students' creative work in designing and building digital games: art and literature games, educational games, games that address diversity and, of course, challenge/adventure games.

The CMDC has recently launched a Game Studies & Design program that aims to teach innovative approaches to games and game environments using augmented reality, virtual reality, motion-capture and motion-tracking technologies and web technologies such as HTML5 and JavaScript. CMDC professors encourage students to make games in their class projects and assignments because it is a process that is challenging, fun and rewarding. Game design and game building integrate many of the theory and practice skills taught in the CMDC program: analytical thinking, information architecture, complex programming, 2D visual design, 3D modeling, interactive and narrative design. Also, designing and building games usually requires students to work cooperatively, sharing unique set of skills with a team.

The games highlighted in this issue are a small sampling of the innovative games work in the program. Not all games get finished - usually because students become overly ambitious with their projects. The product may be completed in the future or may be the launching point for a new game. What is learned in the process, however, is the complex thinking and doing towards a collective goal: to create an engaging experience for human beings.

Will Luers
Lecturer
Student Art Work

Anna Hixon

Find Fern

HTML5, JavaScript and jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



"Find Fern" was a game that I imagined being played by young children. The simple game play, fun vocabulary and easy navigation was intended to mirror that image. Each of the three levels are completed once the player finds (that is, clicks on) Fern. Each level requires the player to surpass a different challenge in order to find Fern. Each interaction between the player and the game is carried out through a variety of jQuery functions, events, and effects. Touch functions were enabled on the most utilized elements to enhance the user experience for those using touch-enabled devices. - Anna Hixon

Student Art Work

Tyler Hickey

Corridor's End

HTML5, JavaScript and jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



This game/interactive fiction piece was made almost entirely using JavaScript and jQuery with a foundation of HTML and CSS. This started as a much smaller project meant to test the limits of my JavaScript knowledge using random numbers and probability, but quickly grew once the game functions had been created. However, at this point there was no sense of progression and only one possible enemy to fight, so more enemy objects were added. The next, and most difficult, obstacle to overcome was generating a branching textual narrative without simply hiding and showing html elements. The result is an original, responsive piece that reflects months of learning and experimentation with JavaScript. -Tyler Hickey

Student Art Work

Sam Van Luik

Snow Drifter

HTML5, JavaScript and jQuery
DTC477 Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



My goal was to create the basic structure for a narrative or quest driven browser game. I wanted to have some basic systems coded, that could be used as jumping off points for more complex games. The systems I focused on creating were dialogue, inventory, crafting, and turn based battles. I managed to accomplish all of these with relative success except for the battle system. I set up a static image map with interactable elements/characters. When the player clicks on one of these characters, a large image of the selected character appears as well as a menu of interaction options including "speak", "loot", "challenge", and "return." Depending on what you select, the character's response will vary, and you may acquire some items. "Challenge" would have initiated the battle sequence.Other than interacting with characters on the map, the player can click the "inventory" button to open a menu that will allow them to view items in their possession, as well as crafting recipes. If the player contains every item needed for a recipe, they can select that recipe and hit the "craft" button. This will create the item detailed in the recipe and place it in the player's inventory, and consume the ingredient items.

Overall, I feel like this project was a little too ambitious, but I am pleased with what I was able to accomplish. I underestimated the complexity of the systems I was trying to create, but I still hope to continue working on this beyond this class and come up with something even more polished. So far, the battle system and some of the quest tracking and item rewards don't work, but the log, inventory menu, crafting, map interactions, and text display all work.- Sam Van Luik

Student Art Work

Project Coordinator: Mike Patten; Game Design/Layout: Terry Bare; Game Design: Bryan Zacharias

The Great American Melting Pot

Board Game: Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator
DTC475 Digital Diversity, Prof. Dene Grigar
project launch



TGAMP is designed to work with minimal electronic support. It is possible to play as a class, without teams, with the board projected on the wall. We encourage card play, as it incorporates tactile learning, as well as group work. Prior to the start of the game, it is recommended that the Instructor of the class brief the students on the purpose of the game. Purpose: The purpose of this game is to attempt to bridge the racial and gender divide we have in this country. It is important for ALL Americans to know that we as a nation would not exist as we do without the critical contributions we have received from members of different genders and races.

Student Art Work

Tanner Clark: Coder/Project manager; Mitchell Barnett: Content Developer/Coder; Ryan Thorton: Designer/Content Developer

Hard Life

Virtual Board Game: Lua scripting, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator
DTC475 Digital Diversity, Prof. Dene Grigar
project launch


Our inspiration was the trivialization of the struggle that low income households face. The premise of our game is similar to the premise of The Game of Life, where you face the trials of life, except Hard Life starts the player off with losing their job. The player needs to find a new job, keep track of the money in their balance, keep themselves healthy, and maintain their newly found job. The process of creating this game mod involved some minor scripting featuring the Lua scripting language, asset creation in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, and playtesting in standard mouse/keyboard setups as well as in VR setups.

Our main goal with this project was to give perspective to those who never had the chance to experience what it's like to live on a low budget. Trying to survive, cutting expenses to your health to increase your performance at work, or not paying for health insurance to pay for rent, and other difficult decisions that need to be made to survive on a small paycheck. The Virtual Reality version of this game gives the game a more tangible feeling, makes it seem more serious and involved and forces the user to experience the choices in a more difficult way. We chose to make the game available for mouse and keyboard as well since few people have access to a virtual reality setup, and reaching as many people as possible helps spread our message.

Exhibit 22 / Moving Images / 09.16

Moving Images

Digital media can be made to move in many different ways. Issue 22 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery highlights the innovate CMDC projects which include animation or video.

In Professor Brenda Grell's 3D animation class (DTC335), students learn how to model a world in three dimensions - the environment, objects and creatures. Then they learn how to bring this world to life. Movement might include guiding a camera eye through the world, animating objects or creaturely gestures.

In Professor Will Luers' Digital Cinema class (DTC338), students model a world by following rules of continuity editing. But what if the world is a computer desktop? One student explored storytelling by showing the movements of a character interacting with a screen. Another student turned a video story into a moving comic strip.

Will Luers
Lecturer
Student Art Work

Mitchell Barnette

Running Late

Adobe Premiere, HTML5
DTC354 Digital Storytelling, Prof. Will Luers
project launch



For my final I knew that I wanted to continue off of my visual narrative, by adding changes that would make it even more comic like. I did this by adding the word bubbles and sound effects. Overall I really enjoyed this project because it allowed me to experiment with something new, which I think could potentially be a new form of video editing. Due to this I plan to do more more "Video" comics in the future. - Mitchell Barnette

Cody Lane

Writer's Block

Adobe Premiere
DTC338- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch

Throughout the entire class I have been focusing on this story I called "Writers Block". Most of the projects I do are my way of working though my own thoughts and feelings. I like to use art to search my own mind. I wanted to tell the story of the struggle one faces after graduation or during any major change in ones life. We all have this idea in our head of what we want to do with our life, and what people say we should do in our life. But sometimes things don't turn out how you think they should be in your mind.-Cody Lane

Nic Stevens

The Final Decision

Adobe Premiere
DTC338- Digital Cinema, Prof. Will Luers
project launch

This is a movie trailer I made based on situations that go wrong and making hard decisions. This was inspired by our discussions on montage, vine, and movie trailer editing. This final cut had 86 different media pieced together including sound effects, video, music, etc.-Nic Stevens

Brianna Savage

Diamond In The Rough

Maya
DTC335- Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

This animation project was created in Maya 16 and inspired from the movie Aladdin. The story is about the white chess pieces against the black side fighting for the magical lamp in a cave. The whole story takes place on a flying carpet in the desert. As the white side is winning the black chess pieces team together and cheat by jumping on the carpet and knocking most of the white pieces off. Once they enter the cave it goes black and all you can hear are both sides fighting and only the black queen is left standing. The king and queen on the white side are the only ones standing on that side. That is when the white queen knocks the black queen off the carpet and wins. Both the king and queen go and they receive the lamp. When creating the king and queen chess pieces I reference the Sultan's hat and Jasmines hair using the colors blue and red to represent the each side. For the audio I combined a creative common song with a mix already created in Garage Band. I tried to keep the pace of the audio on the faster side to get across the feeling of a conflict between both sides. Both sides are trying to over power each other to get to the lamp -Brianna Savage

Erin Carlie

Forest Grump and the Magic Chessboard

Maya
DTC335- Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

Despite this being my first 3D animation, I really wanted to push my own boundaries and see what I could accomplish with what I had learned in my short semester. Having previous experience sculpting with real clay, modeling this project was a joy and an adventure. But with that, I wanted to really challenge myself by bringing something new that I hadn't seen in other animations, which was someone actually playing chess. I wanted this character to move independently of the chessboard and to have a very expressive face. Drawing characters is something I do often, so I wanted to work that in as well. I believe having an expressive character allows for stronger audience connection. So in short, I really wanted to draw my experience with other mediums to bring a different perspective. Another theme I noticed was missing was a nature theme. The idea of a less orderly chessboard and chess pieces really got me thinking of how they would be sculpted and how they would be textured. Not to mention the area lighting, the environment, and how those would set the mood. The goal of the story was to connect through sentimentality rather than concluding violence. I wanted to bring a new story to the project, something that would warm the heart rather than stir up a classic feud. The conflict here isn't violence, but the pieces desire to not conform to chess rules. While the rhino turtle wants to play, they do too, just in a different way. -Erin Carlie

Exhibit 21 / Animation / 06.16

Animation

Animation is a technique that gives us the illusion of motion and change over time. Animation can be abstract, like a blinking circle on a web page, or it can explain complex things and tell moving stories through motion and sound. Whether it is traditional cell animation, stop-motion, video, 3D modeling, digital rotoscoping, gif animation, css and javascript animation or virtual reality, animation involves displaying a sequence of discrete images.

In Professor Brenda Grell's classes, DTC335 and DTC435, CMDC students explore the foundations of animation through a variety of methods and platforms for 2D animation, 3D animation, and VR. In these classes, students learn how to simulate motion and tell stories one frame at a time. Students become animators and can then apply these basic principles of motion simulation to game design, video editing, motion graphics, web design and multiple forms of digital storytelling platforms. Animators understand how to capture and sustain attention through the illusion of motion.

The student work in Issue 21 of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery is a small sample of the excellent and diverse animation work coming out these classes and the CMDC program in general.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Amanda Wolcott - Project Manager
Connor Goglin - VR Developer
Randy Lutrell - Visual Effects
Megan Essman - Social Media
Holly Stassens - Web & Design
Matthew Lyons - Video/Sound

T1VR

Oculus Riftdevelopment kit
DTC 497 Senior Seminar, Dene Grigar
project launch

T1VR is a VR environment that tells the story of the Vancouver Washington waterfront's past, present, and future through a dramatic narrative in which users immerse themselves through visual elements, sound, and movement. As a research project it explores the relationship between the applied practice of virtual reality (VR) development and storytelling approaches.

Michael Bird

Mission Interupted

Maya, After Effects
DTC435- Advanced Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

For this project, I wanted to do an action sequence. However, I did not want to do a simple chase scene. I wanted to do a chase/fight scene. Every project that we do in school is a learning opportunity and every aspect of this project shows a skill that I was either trying to learn or trying to develop. I wanted to develop my skills in environment modeling which is why I chose a city. Having a city as my settting allowed me to model builings, streets, and what was supposed to be a fountain (however bi frost ended up being too much for this project). I also wanted to develop my skills with motion paths. I had never used a motion path before this project and having a chase scene was a perfect way to develop that skill. Character rigging was a requirement for this project, but rigging is not what I want to do with my animation skills, so I tried to keep my rig and character animations as simple as possible. Keeping my rigs and character animations as simple as possible allowed me to focus my time and energy in areas that I wanted to develop. I also wanted to develop my skills in after effects. Special effects is one of the areas I intend to work after school and After Effects seemed like a great place to drevelop that skill. I have not had too much time to work in After Effects prior to the semester that I did this project. However, for this project, I was able to use the light saber plug in, rain, clouds (that I used particle playground to create), and lightning to really bring my animation to life. Lastly I did not want to use human voices for my characters because I wanted to make them seem like aliens. I used sounds that I got from freesound.org for their alien voices. - Michael Bird

Haley Zach

Dreamscape

Adobe Photoshop and Premiere
DTC435- Advanced Animation, Prof. Brenda Grell
project launch

This is an animation that I made for my Advanced Digital Animation (DTC435) class at Washington State University Vancouver. This was my second "big" 3D animation project using Autodesk Maya. The inspiration for characters and the general theme of the project came from a variety of places. Some of these being the movie Tangled (Disney) and the popular game series Final Fantasy. I really enjoyed attempting to create my first complex characters. They by no means are perfect but I enjoyed the process of trial and error when it came to creating them. It was also fun to be able to do some sound design work with this project. While this project was enjoyable is also presented a lot of problems for me. One of the main problems I had was with my rigging. This was my first time rigging "complicated" characters and I had thought that I had rigged them correctly but when I would go to pose my characters the rigging that I had done would not allow for certain poses. As a result of this I had to find alternative ways to move my characters and use creative camera work to hide weird rigging in order to evoke what I wanted. Another thing that I struggled with was actually having a solid narrative in my animation. For the story that I have it is very minimalist and in my opinion lacking of that certain something that makes a good story. I plan on working on my storytelling so that in the future I can produce better stories. - Haley Zach

Haley Zach

H20 Across the Globe

Adobe Photoshop and Premiere
DTC475- Digital Diversity, Prof. Michael Rabby
project launch

Even with modern day technology there are still parts of the world that do not have access to a clean water source. This video was created to be a call to action to improve that access worldwide. This was a group project for the class Digital Diversity at Washington State University Vancouver. For more details on the project please visit our project website: For our animation we chose to use the technique of rotoscoping. None of us had any background with rotoscoping so it was an interesting learning experience. Rotoscoping is a very tedious process but the final product is very rewarding. Programs used for creation:
Song: Dryness - Ketsa




Anna Hixon

Chapter 1: Design

Chapter 2: Information

Chapter 3: Accessibility

Adobe After Effects, Audacity, and Adobe Illustrator
DTC 478 Usability and Interface Design, Prof. John Barber
project 1 launch
project 2 launch
project 3 launch

This animated project was developed to be a useful resource for individuals who may not be familiar with usability, or usable practices in regards to web design and web development. This project manifested in three areas, or terms: "Design", "Information", and "Accessibility". For each term, I developed an animation that discussed helpful mechanisms and "rules of thumb" to consider when thinking about usability through each term. Each of the three terms follow the main theme of developing a webpage with the user, and a user's needs, in mind. The voice-over is by CMDC student Eli Campbell. - Anna Hixon

Jeremy Testerman

Word

Adobe After Effects, Illustrator, and Premiere
DTC 478 Usability and Interface Design, Prof. John Barber
project launch

I created this animation using the Adobe Suite (After Effects, Illustrator, and Premiere), a Sony Alpha DSLR and a pair of chopsticks. The idea behind this animation is based on Marshal McLuhan's The Medium Is The Massage and how the basis of a word is no longer constrained to its physical form. I used many tricks in After Effects to animate the written word and bring it to life. The real challenge was bringing the animated word into the physical space and giving it believable interactions with it's environment. -Jeremy Testerman

Exhibit 20 / Digital Storytelling / 12.21

Digital Storytelling

Storytelling weaves through many of the student projects in the CMDC program. Whether it is in the creation of a game, a social media campaign, the design of an interface, a video sequence or short animation, students are immersed in the art of digital storytelling - of holding and grabbing attention through a multimedia and interactive text. In DTC 354, Digital Storytelling, students are introduced to narrative theory and storytellling traditions, as well as to emergent forms of digital narrative, but in many classes students research, write, design and distribute their own digital stories made in and for a digital and computational environment.

In this issue of the Nouspace Student Research Gallery, we highlight a broad range of digital storytelling genres, techniques, platforms and narrative styles.

Will Luers
Visiting Professor
Student Art Work

Madeleine Brookman

Escape - A Refugee Story

Twine
DTC 354- Digital Storytelling, Will Luers
project launch



"This hypermedia narrative focuses upon the reality of war and being caught in the crossfire. It is a nonlinear experience that uses visual, kinetic, and sonic elements in order to immerse the reader -- who takes on the persona of a new mother as she tries to escape with her child from her wartorn home. There are multiple outcomes to the story, and as such, it is encouraged to go through the piece more than once.

I used a variety of open-source creative commons image and audio files within this piece. All narrative-text is original and authentic."
-Madeleine Brookman

Student Art Work

Jessica Smith

Big City Bounty

HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript
DTC 477- Advanced Multimedia Authoring, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


"The game takes place in a grungy, futuristic city where a crime organization is on the rise and a bounty hunter, the player, is hired to take down the head of the organization. With a mixture of JavaScript and jQuery, I gave the player the option to choose one of four different character portraits and one of three different weapons. The selection of these options activates the jQuery to input the selected character portrait and weapon images into their designated spaces, as well as activates the JavaScript to set the health and attack damage of the weapon the player has chosen. As the player moves through an old warehouse where the boss of the criminal organization is located, they have a chance of running into one wrong room, an attempt at an option for the player to explore, and they have a chance of running into two different bad guys, thugs working for the crime boss, one of which they will always run into because they guard a mandatory path. Overall, the game is quite simple; however, being relatively new to JavaScript and jQuery, it provided a fun challenge for my newfound skills and showed me new ways of accomplishing different tasks. I enjoyed creating this little game and hope others enjoy playing it."
- Jessica Smith

Student Art Work

Bryn Kristi

The Betrayal

HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript
DTC 354- Digital Storytelling, Prof. Will Luers
project launch


"As a final project for my Digital Storytelling and Multimedia Authoring classes, "The Betrayal" blends techinical skills such as HTML and CSS with storytelling. This story includes a click through photo gallery, videos, and multiple endings. I've chosen to use text only to guide the reader, and tell the story solely through images. The reader can be the judge, view all 3 sides to the story then choose which character is right at the end."
- Bryn Kristi

Paul Meiners

Phone Drones

Adobe Premiere
DTC338- Video Narratives, Prof. Will Luers
project launch

"For this assignment we were supposed to create a three to five minute video that was either a journalistic video or a short narrative fiction. I choose to make a fiction that explored an extreme outcome of the current phone culture. In the video, everyone is constantly staring at their phones, and there is no human interaction. One day the unnamed protagonist of the video breaks his phone and experiences a world beyond his phone. I chose this idea for several reasons. First, because I think this is a universal issue that people of nearly every age are concerned about, and second, because I thought it was an idea that would be interesting to translate into video. One of the biggest challenges I faced during filming was choosing my shots. Since it was a silent video, each shot had to communicate the story without help from words. I also had a large cast so coordinating their schedules, and directing them all during shooting proved to be a difficulty. In the end I was pleased with the result, and felt like this project forced me to use everything I had learned in the class."
-Paul Meiners

Polina Sklyarova, Janelle Cortez

Two Worlds Apart

Adobe Premiere
DTC338- Video Narratives, Prof. Will Luers
project launch

"During the project, we had an enjoyable experience filming all types of creative shots but there were times of difficulty such as lighting and getting the right framing. The biggest challenge we faced was our final scene in which the audience sees these two girls finally crossing paths with each other. That scene was obviously staged, but it was planned carefully and measured exactly for the whole scene to come together and look real. Though, we did want to create a divide and showed that by using the garbage matte effect in Adobe Premiere. We also had a hard time with editing and cutting since we had tons of great footage. Choosing the right shots while making sure continuity was present was also a challenge but we made it work. In addition to meeting the time restriction, we had to cut down on some of the continuity and get rid of extraneous shots. We also applied a speed up effect to save us some time and have room for the final scene. All in all, we learned a great deal about the filming process. Now we see why movies take an incredibly long amount of time to produce. So much effort goes into every single detail, whether something should be in auto focus or not, looking at how the lighting looks, keeping subjects in place for continuity to work, working with camera angles and framing, creating a good setting, etc. Overall, a great and fun process."
-Polina and Janelle

Student Art Work

Kate Palermini, Yuriy Kuprikov, Cody Moncur, Alan McGinnis and Nathan Whittington

Project Real Life

HTML5, CSS3, and JQuery/Javascript
DTC 475: Digital Diversity, Prof. Dene Grigar
project launch


Can games be used to create a deeper understanding of the social issues and challenges of modern society and open pathways of new communication between different perspectives? "Project Real Life" simulates real life experiences focusing on the idea that a person is born into a set financial class that they do not choose and must navigate the world within those parameters.

  • Kate Palermini--Project Manager
  • Yuriy Kuprikov--Designer
  • Cody Moncur--Coding
  • Alan McGinnis--Coding
  • Nathan Whittington––Content Specialist
Student Art Work

Serena Devera-Taualo, Josh Gellinger, Connor Goglin, Justine Hanrahan and Holly Stassens

Xenos

Unreal Engine 4
DTC 475: Digital Diversity, Prof. Dene Grigar


download zip for Mac
download zip for PC 32Bit
download zip for PC 64Bit

What challenges do people with language barriers face in a new environment? This game explores the challenges associated with living in a land where one does not know the language. Game for Change that will run on a PC or Mac using Unreal Engine 4.

  • Serena Devera-Taualo - Project Manager
  • Josh Gellinger - Multimedia Designer
  • Connor Goglin - Coders/Programmers
  • Justine Hanrahan - Content Specialist
  • Holly Stassens - Artist